You need to treat your data as you would treat your own money

 In disruption, personal security, security

It seems like every second story I read is about a company being hacked.

In this disruptive world, we now need to assume we ARE going to be hacked and take steps to prevent it happening.

As I have written previously, the “last mile” of defence against hacking falls to employees. I am sure many would not be surprised to learn that confidential and sensitive information is often stored in personal Gmail accounts, for convenience more than anything.

If a personal Gmail or social media account is breached, then hackers literally have the “keys to the kingdom”, and your network. It is for this reason that I believe that employees need to be part of your cyber defences, and companies need to provide awareness and training on how to secure accounts.

Simple tips such as enabling two-factor authentication (2FA) on all accounts can help make it harder to have your employee’s accounts hacked and potentially increasing your security risk.

I have included useful links below to help you and your employees start tightening up personal account security. Many banks now employ 2FA such as a security token, meaning you have to prove who you are with 2 methods before accessing your money.

You need to treat your data as you would treat your own money.

Useful links:

How to enable 2FA on hundreds of accounts: https://dgital.link/two-factor/

Longer form rationale for involving your employees in your overall cybersecurity plan:
http://dgital.link/drum-dont-get-hacked/

My original piece on how the Clinton campaign came undone from a Gmail hack: https://dgital.link/2fa

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About 

Based in London, Andrew is an internationally renowned thought leader in the fields of digital transformation, social business, and digital eminence. Andrew is a multiple TEDx and Keynote Speaker, and a former Global Managing Partner at IBM.