Being on stage is just 25% of the effort required when a public speaker

 In public speaking

Think presenting at events is all about throwing some slides together and turning up to speak?

Think again. If you want your talk to be remembered, you need to do much more work at the pre-talk stage. As we’re in the middle of peak conference session, I’m reminded of the tips I give other speakers I meet at events.

I wrote the post below last year, but it is still as relevant today.

The tl;dr version of the post is

1. Arrive early at the venue

2. Find and befriend the tech team

3. Befriend the event organiser

4. Speak to the person taking photographs

5. Embed ALL your videos & sound files on your laptop locally

6. Video your presentation

7. Stick to time

8. Rehearse

The feedback I received from talks last week proved to me that these extra steps are what it is really all about.

Being on stage is just 25% of the effort required to go from being a good public speaker to a great one!

I had someone who books speakers for a living tell me that they wish they had more speakers like me to choose from, such was my attention to detail and my desire to please not just the client who booked me, but also the audience that may have paid to hear me.

What do other speakers think?
Jeremy Waite Mark Schaefer Brian Solis Hugo Pinto Jeffrey Hayzlett Nathalie Nahai Kelly Hoey

Read my full tips on how to be a better public speaker here.

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About 

Based in London, Practical Futurist and former Global Managing Partner at IBM, Andrew Grill is a popular and sought-after presenter and commentator on issues around digital disruption, workplace of the future and new technologies such as blockchain. Andrew is a multiple TEDx and International Keynote Speaker.