Why two influence metrics are better than one

Home / influence / Why two influence metrics are better than one

As the former CEO of Kred, I am often asked …

“so how is Kred better than …”.

It is a fair question as there are a number of other more established influencer platforms in the market, and only now are major brands starting to understand how powerful influencer marketing can be.

The “how are you better than” question can easily be answered in a tweet as we have very different approach to Kred’s rivals.  Kred is…

1. Real time

2. Fully transparent

3. Community focused

4. Provides a dual score

Taking each key difference and expanding

1. Real time – Kred has had access to the Twitter firehose since November 2008 via a partnership with Twitter (one of the handful of companies around the world that have a direct connection to the firehose, and as such they don’t go via a 3rd party).

This means that they have built a platform that can handle tweets in real time.

As such Kred scores are updated every 1/2 second and your updated score and the Tweet / Facebook post that generated that score is always available on your live Kred activity statement – like a frequent flyer statement for influence.  Other platforms update scores on a daily or weekly basis.


2. Fully transparent
– having a live activity statement is just part of the desire to be fully transparent.  If you can see how the score goes up or down and what drives that action, then I think you will have much more confidence in your score and the platform.

Kred also publishes the full set of rules, points, curves etc on our Kred Rules page.  Does your preferred influence platform do this?  Kred has had this page live since launch and it is updated when new networks are added to the platform.

As a company Kred has a fully transparent approach.  They try and answer every tweet to @kred and when I was CEO you could find me responding directly to tweets, DMs and also making myself available for interviews with bloggers and the press.  If you’d like to interview me for an article or post, my direct contact details are at grill.im


3. Community focus
– other platforms look at “topics”, and I’ve heard anecdotally of people being told they are influential in “cheese” or “prison”. In fact I have been influential in “Thomas Power” for over a year now.  These topics can also be bombed – making them hard to believe as a reliable indication of what area you are influential in.

Last time I looked, humans form communities, not topics. As such Kred took the approach to look for communities of interest, based on your biography, hashtags and tweets. Those that say they are mad about classic cars probably belong in a classic car community.

Having developed these communities (and we can further refine these for brands based on market segments, demographics and location), Kred then looks at where you have influence.

A quick peek at my Kredentials shows which communities I influence.  As you click on each of these communities, you will see my scores change.  Clearly I will have a different level of influence in different communities.

andrewgrill-communities

4. Dual score – this is probably the most visible difference between Kred and the other platforms.

Kred Influence is the measure of what others do because of you. Your Influence score increases when someone takes an action because of your content on Twitter or any other network you have connected to your Kred profile.  This number is normalised out of 1,000.

Kred Outreach is the measure of your generosity. Outreach increases when you retweet, @reply, or follow a new person.

As you accumulate outreach Points, you move to a higher outreach level. Since outreach points are a reward for being active and benevolent, your Outreach level will never go down.

Other platforms have a single score (generally out of 100).  Clearly the higher the number the “better”, however with a single score, and not being able to see how it was developed (were there lots of spammy tweets that raised the score – no idea?) and how it moves up or down it becomes harder to understand if the score is meaningful and relevant to you as an individual and also for a brand.

As I was preparing this post (in June 2012), I noticed my **other** influence score dropped over the weekend from around 56 to 24. The historical view shows I’ve always had a score of 24 – strange??  UPDATE: 4 hours later I am back to 56. Perhaps some influencer turbulence?

So I can’t honestly tell you much about a single influence score out of 100. Brands need to be wary of the single score and not rely on it as the only metric to reward key influencers.

If I give someone a mobile phone for example because they have a “high” score, however on deeper examination I see that their main area of influence has nothing to do with my marketing objectives then I’m going to be pretty annoyed.

With the Kred dual score, and community scores, not only can I instantly see their influence AND outreach (measure of generosity and likelihood that they will share content, RT people etc), I can see where they really have influence rather than just hoping for the best.


Kred in action

Kred worked with a large global brand was sponsoring a major sporting event in the UK.

We used tightly defined Kred communities to find those that might be interested in the sporting event, then ranked them by Kred outreach score.

In working directly with the brand’s sponsorship agency (part of being transparent is we share the influencer lists), we saw a direct correlation between the outreach score and the likelihood that the influencer would be interested in attending the sporting event and talking about it.

Kred Outreach scores of between 8-10 and above saw very positive feedback when contacted.  A Kred outreach score of below 5 showed there was a low likelihood that they would be interested in talking about the experience.

This is a really useful way of determining a person’s real influence and likelihood they will talk about the brand within their community.


What does this all mean?

As the CEO of Kred, naturally when I wrote this blog post I was pushing our approach. The questions you should be asking when looking at any influencer platform from an individual or brand perspective include:

1. Can I easily understand my score? Does the company have a section of their website that clearly and transparently explains how the scores are developed and why they change?

2. Can I see when and why my score changes?

3. Can I easily pinpoint who I influence and why?

4. Can I go deeper than a single number to understand more about my or someone else’s influencer score?

Your comments as always are welcome. As I have been saying for some time, the Kred score should play a key part in finding and understanding influencers, importantly it should not be the only thing you use in an influencer marketing campaign.

As someone who wants the influencer marketing industry to grow, I feel it is my duty to alert end users that they should go beyond a single number when using influencer platforms.  Brands who just rely on a single number to reward influencers may be in for a rude shock!

In the meantime head to http://kred.com – sign up for free and see if Kred makes more sense to you than what you are using at the moment to measure influence.

If you enjoyed this blog post you may like other related posts listed below under You may also like ...

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About 

Based in London, Andrew is an internationally renowned thought leader in the field of social business and social media networks. Andrew is a Global Partner with IBM, with a focus on Social Business.



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  • http://twitter.com/niallcook/status/212178089327865858/ Niall Cook (@niallcook)

    Good analysis from @kred’s @AndrewGrill on why two influence metrics are better than one: http://t.co/okKWsKDt

  • AndrewGrill

    @niallcook Thanks Niall – tried to be objective given where I am sitting. Look forward to the comments on this…

  • niallcook

    @AndrewGrill indeed. I’m sure @azeem will be along soon… ;-)

  • charliesaidthat

    @niallcook @Kred @AndrewGrill don’t klout give you 3. #devilsadvocate

  • http://twitter.com/chowandchatter/status/212181095293259777/ RebeccaSubbiah RD (@chowandchatter)

    RT @AndrewGrill: Why two influence metrics are better than one http://t.co/hTDqngJ2 #kred

  • AndrewGrill

    @charliesaidthat @niallcook Talking about the headline score eg my @Kred is “884/8″ – needs to be topline not buried #devilsadvocate

  • niallcook

    @charliesaidthat @kred @andrewgrill And @PeerIndex does too. Our brand benchmarking gives you 10! #minesbiggerthanyours

  • charliesaidthat

    @AndrewGrill *grins* I think I prefer your way of counting up social outreach scores in realtime etc. :)

  • http://twitter.com/jeremywaite/status/212202514563600385/ Jeremy Waite (@jeremywaite)

    RT @AndrewGrill: Why two influence metrics are better than one http://t.co/yfMaSglB #kred

  • AndrewGrill

    @NickKellet Nick, appreciate the RT.

  • NickKellet

    @AndrewGrill Pleasure:) I’m fan. Sad I missed your San Fran event last week. My cofounder made it @shyamster

  • AndrewGrill

    @NickKellet Glad you’re a fan of @kred. Hope @shyamster enjoyed the tweetup

  • http://twitter.com/TonyaHallRadio/status/212222958335295488/ (@TonyaHallRadio) (@TonyaHallRadio)

    Why two influence metrics are better than one http://t.co/VjWXlHSw #kredcrew RT @charlesyap @AndrewGrill:

  • http://twitter.com/PeopleBrowsr/status/212241836520112129/ PeopleBrowsr (@PeopleBrowsr)

    RT @NickKellet: Why two influence metrics are better than one eg [ @Klout , @Peerindex ] http://t.co/SUn5mfXd via @kred’s CEO @andrewgrill

  • http://twitter.com/JessicaNorthey/status/212248852445659136/ Jessica Northey (@JessicaNorthey)

    Why two influence metrics are better than one http://t.co/1I7FNCCu via @AndrewGrill #Kred (nice post AG!)

  • AndrewGrill

    @JessicaNorthey thanks for the RT! #Kred #kredcrew

  • http://twitter.com/marc_friedman/status/212251809438375936/ Marc Friedman (@marc_friedman)

    Fantastic article about why @Kred is superior for businesses incorporating #SocialMediaInfluence into their strategies: http://t.co/145NP7Dl

  • LindaBarlow

    @CharlieSlang @AndrewGrill @kred Very interesting!

  • http://twitter.com/Cagoraman/status/212337114073923585/ Jan Kaptein (@Cagoraman)

    RT @zaibatsu: Great read: Why two #influence metrics are better than one http://t.co/U5PRSicu by @AndrewGrill @kred #sm

  • http://twitter.com/arfulmer/status/212338005350940673/ (@arfulmer) (@arfulmer)

    RT @zaibatsu: Great read: Why two #influence metrics are better than one http://t.co/U5PRSicu by @AndrewGrill @kred #sm

  • http://twitter.com/Bridgeways/status/212346735383678976/ Karen @hkharbourcity (@Bridgeways)

    “@AndrewGrill: @rudileung @Bridgeways here is a little post to help explain @kred & why we’re different http://t.co/3ulqCYGk” / Tx a lot!

  • Bridgeways

    @AndrewGrill Tx for sharing! @hkharbourcity scores differently at @kred and @Klout and we are doing comparison! #SocialMedia

  • hkharbourcity

    Thanks @Bridgeways @AndrewGrill @kred @Klout Thank you for the detailed article on #Kred

  • rudileung

    That’s a great article @AndrewGrill Let me study a bit more & see how it goes :) @Bridgeways @kred

  • http://twitter.com/Bridgeways/status/212362201980346368/ Karen @hkharbourcity (@Bridgeways)

    “@AndrewGrill: @rudileung @Bridgeways here is a little post to help explain @kred & why we’re different http://t.co/3ulqCYGk” / @vista

  • http://twitter.com/Bridgeways/status/212362364421545984/ Karen @hkharbourcity (@Bridgeways)

    “@AndrewGrill: @rudileung @Bridgeways here is a little post to help explain @kred & why we’re different http://t.co/3ulqCYGk” / @akiohong

  • http://twitter.com/traviswallis/status/212369033339740162/ (@traviswallis) (@traviswallis)

    RT @zaibatsu: Great read: Why two #influence metrics are better than one http://t.co/U5PRSicu by @AndrewGrill @kred #sm

  • http://greensboro-nc.com/ nc

    Great post well put two sources of data used for ranking is defiantly better than one source. Well Done and thak you.

  • http://twitter.com/rubensjose/status/212523461057323008/ Rubens José de Souza (@rubensjose)

    RT @promutualeat: RT Zaibatsu: Great read: Why two #influence metrics are better than one http://t.co/o7S6OSTN by @AndrewGrill @kred #sm

  • http://twitter.com/gaeloizel/status/212543748041740288/ Gael Oizel (@gaeloizel)

    RT @nickkellet: Why two influence #metrics are better than one eg [ @klout , @PeerIndex ] http://t.co/T2zzHjbW via @Kred’s CEO @AndrewGrill

  • http://twitter.com/SDAllenToronto/status/212598736168288258/ Stephen Allen (@SDAllenToronto)

    London Calling » Why two influence metrics are better than one http://t.co/F0Nol5dr OR why #KRED is better than #KLOUT

  • TonyC2058

    @SDAllenToronto Are you still Kreding and Klouting?

  • SDAllenToronto

    @TonyC2058 @sdallentoronto Just using KRED for now. KLOUT is imho a bit sketchy.

  • http://twitter.com/obazenath/status/212991837772845056/ Nathaniel Obaze (@obazenath)

    @nathobaze. Why two influence metrics are better than one http://t.co/C9T9BjOM

  • yourlisbonguide

    @AndrewGrill @karenbryan @kred Thanks Andy I will take a look Are your on skype for a chat – Lisbon & London are on the same time.

  • karenbryan

    @AndrewGrill I had a look & @Kred does seem less open to manipulation if one score is based on actions taken by others.

  • AndrewGrill

    @karenbryan every system can be gamed when humans are involved. With Kred, you can if someone is gaming as we show each & every action

  • calvinjhun

    Kred is definitely one of the best social media tools out there. If you’d like to find out more about Kred (and the possibility of sourcing candidates, check out a blog post from identified.com: bit.ly/NKSAMC

  • ValaAfshar

    @AndrewGrill I agree – I just watched your video with @armano – very insightful. Thank you.

  • DigitalBlonde

    @ollygosling having met @andrewgrill he is one of those people who totally believes in what he is selling. on tests on my own accounts 1/2

  • ollygosling

    @DigitalBlonde @andrewgrill oh I’m sure, I wasn’t insinuating otherwise… :-) He SHOULD be slightly biased…

  • ollygosling

    @AndrewGrill @digitalblonde is 8 good then…? ;-)

  • ollygosling

    @AndrewGrill @DigitalBlonde Maybe I’m not using it properly. I thought we were both listed in tech / social media / marketing communities?

  • AndrewGrill

    @ollygosling yes you both share these communities. Click on blue triangle to right of Global Kred above badge – shows more @DigitalBlonde

  • AndrewGrill

    @ollygosling @digitalblonde 8 is very good shows u rgenerous with yr community. See http://t.co/8oggeZeL for all details. We’re transparent

  • ollygosling

    @AndrewGrill @digitalblonde I’ll take a closer look for sure. Thanks for taking the time to talk about it. Makes a refreshing change… :-)

  • AndrewGrill

    @ollygosling always happy to talk about @kred influence or social media in general – we love to chat! cc @digitalblonde

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  • http://twitter.com/jeremywaite/status/223377636192296961/ (@jeremywaite) (@jeremywaite)

    RT @AndrewGrill: @jeremywaite from that screenshot @kred already tells a broader story 100 vs 1000/8 why > http://t.co/yfMaSglB #figaroconference

  • AndrewGrill

    @ollygosling @andrewgrill I have found @kred showing more reliable metrics. What is your view 2/2

  • AndrewGrill

    @AndrewGrill @digitalblonde I’ll take a closer look for sure. Thanks for taking the time to talk about it. Makes a refreshing change… :-)

  • AndrewGrill

    @ollygosling always happy to talk about @kred influence or social media in general – we love to chat! cc @digitalblonde

  • AndrewGrill

    @DigitalBlonde @AndrewGrill surely a tad biased though…!? ;-)

  • AndrewGrill

    @ollygosling having met @andrewgrill he is one of those people who totally believes in what he is selling. on tests on my own accounts 1/2

  • AndrewGrill

    @AndrewGrill @digitalblonde is 8 good then…? ;-)

  • AndrewGrill

    @AndrewGrill @DigitalBlonde Maybe I’m not using it properly. I thought we were both listed in tech / social media / marketing communities?

  • AndrewGrill

    @ollygosling @digitalblonde 8 is very good shows u rgenerous with yr community. See http://t.co/8oggeZeL for all details. We’re transparent

  • AndrewGrill

    @DigitalBlonde @andrewgrill oh I’m sure, I wasn’t insinuating otherwise… :-) He SHOULD be slightly biased…

  • AndrewGrill

    @ollygosling @andrewgrill haha I know you weren’t :-) x

  • AndrewGrill

    @DigitalBlonde @andrewgrill Measuring social influence makes a lot of sense! But I’m not sure anyone has properly cracked it yet… 1/2

  • AndrewGrill

    @ollygosling your @kred score is different to @sherylsandberg – for starters your outreach is 8 (woot!) hers is zero cc @digitalblonde

  • AndrewGrill

    @ollygosling @andrewgrill that is why I was comparing hospitality knowing peoples offline influence

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